A number of fellow Catholics over the years have asked me for advice and encouragement about going to Confession.  Few things make me more glad than to share my love and appreciation for this very special Sacrament, and I pray very hard that all Catholics may be drawn to it.  At the same time, I also understand that it’s not an easy thing to do.  So, especially now that we are in Lent, I would like to offer some encouragement for my brothers and sister who might be having difficulty approaching the Sacrament.  (The following is from a letter I wrote to one dear person this evening; but I think it might be applicable and helpful to many people.)


I understand how much trepidation we can experience about going to Confession.  It never completely goes away; I still struggle with it occasionally, and I’m sure everybody does.  The reason is that the devil wants to prevent us all from going and receiving the tremendous grace, nourishment, and healing of the Sacrament.  He will throw every lie and every negative feeling at us in order to stop us, to make us afraid, to make us distrustful and doubtful.

To withstand these difficult things takes God’s grace.  Nobody can do it alone.  And so, what you should do now and very often is simply ask the Lord for His peace and for the grace to go to Confession.  It may be helpful to pray this Act of Contrition–and note especially the part I’ve emphasized:

O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee, and I detest my sins because of Thy just punishment, but most of all because they offend Thee, my God, who art all good and deserving of all my love.  I firmly resolve, with the help of Thy grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life. Amen. 

Pray that at least once a day, and it won’t be long until you start to feel much more at ease and even eager to go to Confession.

Trust that there are good reasons that Christ instituted the Sacrament of Reconciliation and made human priests ministers of His mercy.  The Sacrament itself provides not only sanctifying grace, but a very special, particular sacramental grace–that of stronger resistance to sin.  The priest, as a fellow sinner and fellow penitent, can provide valuable help and guidance.  As a fellow human, he can speak those wonderful words of absolution in a voice we can hear.

You certainly have nothing to fear from a confessor.  You may think that he will be judgmental or perhaps even outraged at your sins.  But he won’t.  I’ve heard many priests say that sin is just sin–it’s boring, it’s dull, it’s unimaginative, it’s completely unremarkable.  What they find truly remarkable is the courage and humility and faith of the penitents who come to them.  And they feel privileged to be able to help and heal and minister to them.


I will just add here what I have told myself and others many times:  In the whole universe, there is only one person who benefits from our not going to Confession–and that’s Satan.  Don’t give him that benefit!

Also, I welcome anybody to contact me to ask further questions about Confession.  I don’t ever get tired of talking about it!

It was just about a year ago that I moved to my new home, a house I share with my mother.  It’s a lovely house, in a suburb.  There’s really nothing to dislike about it.  But it’s been a pretty big adjustment for me, having lived in the city center for a number of years.  I have a much longer commute to work and to the Dominican priory.  I had to find, and join, a different parish.  I feel out of place as an unmarried women living among young families.  Even when I’ve found activities and events that interest me and that are close to home, I haven’t been able to get out and do things because I get home late in the evening.  Or, in many cases, the activities of interest occur during the work week, during work hours.

For many months, I’ve been sort of drifting along, going through motions, without ever having the slightest sense that I belong where I am, that it is really my home.  I’ve given in sometimes to discouragement, discontent, loneliness, frustration, anxiety–most of which I’ve tried to cure by just closing myself up in my room with a video game or television show.  Naturally, this only increased my isolation, so that I fell into a downward spiral of depression.  In trying to numb or distract myself, I also stopped putting God at the center of my life.  I became lax in my prayer and religious obligations.

Fortunately, I did have the sense to go to Confession and dust myself off to try again.  And fortunately, I also had Lent approaching quickly, and a new focus and purpose to put myself to.  Of course, God and His grace are what have seen me through most of all.

So I started praying every day, several times a day:

Lord, please just help me settle down and be more at home here.  Help me find ways to become part of this new community and my new parish.  Help me find ways to contribute and form new relationships.  I trust that you have planted me here for a reason.  Whether or not that reason becomes clear to me, please help me to accept my new place and to flourish.

I can’t say that I’ve had any remarkable epiphanies.  I can’t say anything has progressed.  I definitely can’t say that I’ve discovered the reason for my being where I am.  But at least I have my faith and am clinging closer to God’s side once more–and that always makes life so much richer.  As part of my Lenten discipline, I am going to keep praying that prayer, along with all my other prayers and observances, and I’m not going to let myself give in to impatience or distrust.  I know that the feelings will come, and the temptation to entertain them will be strong.  But I’m not going to give in.

So, yesterday morning, as I was going about my business of getting ready for work, I turned one of the music channels on to help get my blood pumping.  And this song came on: “Home” by Phillip Phillips.  A song I’d heard before but never paid too much attention to.  But this time, for whatever reason, I found myself really listening to the lyrics:

Settle down, it’ll all be clear
Don’t pay no mind to the demons
They fill you with fear
The trouble—it might drag you down
If you get lost, you can always be found

Just know you’re not alone
‘Cause I’m gonna make this place your home

It was one of those amazing, unexpected moments when words strike you and move you and seem to have been meant just for you.  And you wonder: how did I not hear this before?  I know that many people would just shrug it off as a coincidence, nothing important.  But if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that there’s no such thing as a coincidence–not in the sense of something unimportant and accidental.  So, my spirit has been very uplifted!  And I feel sure that my prayer to be more at home has been heard and will be answered.

But, you know, feel free to add your own prayers for me!  :)

A blessed Ash Wednesday to everybody!  I find the prayer for today to be a really stirring send-off into the great season of Lent:

Grant, O Lord, that we may begin with holy fasting

this campaign of Christian service,

so that, as we take up battle against spiritual evils,

we may be armed with weapons of self-restraint.

With its images of campaign, battle, and weapons, this prayer is an explicit and vivid call to spiritual warfare.  And it tells us exactly what we need in order to wage–and win–the battle: fasting, service, and self-restraint.  This echoes and expands upon the traditional trio of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving, each of which is so important, not only for spiritual warfare but for life in general.

Is it not a tremendous blessing that each year brings this season of Lent in which we can focus on deepening and growing and maturing in our spiritual lives?  Is it not an exciting time?  A kind of adventure?  The word Lent means “Springtime,” and that is a perfect name for this season of new opportunities for flourishing.

For a long time, I always thought of Lent as a dreary season of drudgery, with nothing uplifting or exciting or adventurous at all.  I didn’t see it as the wonderful opportunity that it is.  I didn’t realize or appreciate any of the rewards it can bring.  I looked at Lent through the lens of the secular world and culture: just another way the Church crushed happiness and imposed pain upon its benighted and masochistic adherents.  I much preferred the popular modern worldview that equates happiness with pleasure and goodness with feeling good.  But that worldview leads nowhere.  Follow it long enough and you may easily find yourself in the nothingness, the hopelessness, the extreme and all-consuming poverty of Hell.  Those fortunate enough (as I was), will experience a taste of Hell before it is too late and becomes an eternal dwelling.

I don’t deny that the season of Lent and the entirety of Christian life can sometimes be difficult, uncomfortable, and uncertain.  But the rewards–especially the ultimate, eternal reward of Heaven–far outshine any of the difficult spots.  And they really are just little spots when you pause to look back over where you’ve come.  Little spots amidst oceans of joy, of love, of peace, and above all, of grace.  Lent is a powerful means of unleashing those oceans!

So, let us all dare to leave behind some of our comfort and security and complacence–which make it all too easy to be self-centered–and have a successful Lent!

I’ve just embarked on another new year in my life, another year older and hopefully wiser.  The birthdays seem to come more rapidly each year.  But I don’t mind.  I like growing and maturing.  That’s all it is–just me, the same as always, only better.  More myself, more comfortable in my own skin, more appreciative of life and being part of the world, more joyful and more grateful.  Especially at this time of year!  Autumn is finally in the air here in Texas, which means I’m feeling rather high-spirited.

Perhaps it’s the combination of maturing and becoming energized that have made me start thinking about dreams and pursuits that I have not yet seen through.  One of these is acting.  The only time I feel really good and really confident about expressing myself orally, out loud, is when I have a part to read and a character to be.  Becoming somebody else, putting somebody else’s words (or my own) out into the world to be heard is such a wonderful, liberating, transformative experience.  I want to give it a try, in a public way.  If for no other reason, I want to do it just so I won’t have to regret not doing it.

I guess that’s also why I enjoy Halloween so much, and costuming in general.  This year was really fun.  I don’t know if I’ve mentioned it, but I love Doctor Who!  And so, I decided to be a female version of the Doctor!

         Doctor Heather 2

As you might know, my clothes were inspired by the 10th Doctor.  The snacks I brought to the office party, however, are the 11th Doctor’s favorite snack (as well as Dalek-threatening ploy):

Jammie Dodgers

I suspect that lots of people didn’t realize I was actually in costume that day–but that made it all the more satisfying when I encountered fellow Whovians who got it!  I ran into a few people who apparently thought that my costume was a librarian, and were rather amazed that, in fact, I am a librarian in real, everyday life.  LOL!

Real, everyday life is plugging ahead.  I can’t complain about a thing, but just try to make it even better.  Before we know it, Thanksgiving, Advent, and Christmas will be here, and another calendar year will begin.  But for now, I just want to recite Shakespeare, wear cozy clothes, and drink warm things!  Happy Autumn, everybody!

Dear friends, heartfelt apologies for my long absence.  A lot has been going on, both in the world and in my own little life–the two are interconnected of course.  Watching and reading the news has often gotten the better of me in the last few months.  So much, so much wrong and evil and indignity in the world.  However, it has helped me view my own life in a constructive way and come to some rather large decisions about how I want to live my life right now, in my current state of life, which happens to be singlehood.

1.  No more mourning my singlehood.  And I have been mourning, mostly because I’ve been coming to terms with the difficult truth: I may be single for the rest of my life.  That’s all there is to it.  And all the good-intentioned folks who say, “Oh no, there’s still time for you.  Why my so-and-so didn’t marry until they were well into their forties!” can’t deny the fact that such things don’t happen for everybody.  They just don’t, and the likelihood gets slimmer and slimmer every day.  This is especially true the stricter one’s morals are regarding sex, marriage, and family.  Which brings me to:

2.  No more resenting Catholicism for my singlehood.  It’s been the single biggest, baddest temptation I’ve had.  “If only I weren’t Catholic, things would be so much easier, and I’d have so many more options!”  It must be Satan’s favorite trick, using broken hearts to drive people from the Church.  It may be one of his most successful, too, though I hope not.  By God’s grace, I’ve tended to see it for what it is, and have realized how far below me it would be and how utterly miserable I would be if I gave into it. That doesn’t mean I haven’t struggled with it, though.  I still feel it niggling at me sometimes–in fact even this very moment.  But it’s just not an option.  I’m putting my foot down!

3.  No more feeling powerless to change the world and create a better future.  I’m so tired of it! So what if I’m just one person?  So what if my way of seeing things and doing things is unpopular?  History has borne witness to it time and time again: one person can make a difference.  They may never see it or know about it in this lifetime, but again, so what?  If I didn’t believe this, my faith as a Catholic would ring hollow.  If I really gave a flying fig about being popular, there’s no way I’d be a Catholic.  But I do know this: a Catholic is not a powerless person.  This is because a Catholic is never just one person, but a person in communion.  A person backed up by their family in heaven and on earth.

4.  Vive la Revolution!  Down with the stale, sterile, hedonistic, dehumanizing sexual revolution of the last century!  It’s time for the bold, daring, heroic, 21st-century revolution: purity, chastity, self-giving, and self-control.  I truly believe this on its own can–and will–undo many ills.  It’s made a world of difference in my own life and self.  I know it’s done the same for other individuals.  Every wide societal change begins with individuals!  I cannot over-emphasize the importance of purity.  Purity purges sin and disorder and allows every other virtue to take root and flourish.  It heals, makes whole, and makes new.

Basically, what it comes down to is getting over and beyond myself, rejecting falsehoods, being brave enough to be counter-cultural, being faithful to what matters most, refusing to degrade myself in order to win approval or get by more easily, and refusing to feel in any way less valuable a person just because of a particular state in life.

Don’t get me wrong, this is not a renunciation of marriage.  If I were to someday be blessed to meet a wonderful man who’s right and good for me and enter with him into Holy Matrimony, I would fall to my knees in gratitude!  It’s just now, if that never happens–I’m still going to fall to my knees in gratitude!  On good days and bad days–every day!

It’s been a bit of a tough road to make peace with all of this, but it truly has been liberating and edifying.  I guess I just wanted to offer this as encouragement to anybody who’s in a similar situation.  You will find peace that this world cannot give, and the most glorious freedom and joy!


PS–I want to give special thanks to my local Lay Dominican family, because I have been so inspired and encouraged by their preaching and teaching on the topic of purity in recent months.  It came at just the right time in my life to really get me moving forward and taking positive steps!

Valentine’s Day is difficult when you are single. I know that all too well, and I keep all single people in my thoughts and prayers on this day when love and romance are celebrated and loneliness and yearning are cast in darker, sharper shadow.

I’m not going to tell anybody not to feel sad or lonely or broken-hearted. It is only human to feel these things. Remember, however, that such things are only part of the ephemeral world, which is passing so quickly. They are not part of the eternal life that God wishes to share with us even, to some degree, while we are here in the world.  As such, we should never let ourselves become fixated on them. Feel them, yes–and then offer them up.  Today is Friday, right? Make it part of your Friday penance and your remembrance of the Lord’s Passion. Take those feelings and lay them at the foot of the Cross. Lift up your broken heart to the Crucified Lord and ask Him to make it whole. He will do it.

Instead of dwelling on what you lack, take some time to remember all of the many great blessings and wonders God has filled your life with. Remember that no person loves you and cherishes you more than God does. Let your heart be full of love and gratitude for Him. Also let your heart be full of love and gratitude for the people who are in your life: family members, friends, colleagues, teachers and mentors. The love we share with these people may not be as thrilling as romantic love, but it is generally more constant and loyal, every day of the year. There are also many, many people out in the world who are even more lonely and hurting and unloved than we are–even if they may not appear to be so. Look kindly on every person you meet. You never know how much good a smile or a hello might do for them–and for you too.

Know that you are not truly alone. I know that sometimes it feels like you are the only single person in the whole world on Valentine’s Day. You’re not. Your bonds with others who are in the same situation may span time and space–but they are there. This is especially true for Christians. We are never alone. No matter how isolated and alienated we might feel, the Church never fails to include us in her loving, universal embrace. We have people in Heaven, in Purgatory, and on Earth who share the familial bonds of the Church. None of them are ignorant of what we are going through and how we are feeling.

Have a happy and blessed day!

Yes, my Patron Saint for 2014 is none other than St. Peter! St. Peter

I think I can imagine why he might have chosen me as his charge. I think he and I have one major character trait in common: an impetuosity that can be a good thing and a bad thing, a strength and a weakness. It can be bold and brave. It can also be reckless and imprudent. It can grow like an oak from devotion, determination, and steadfastness. It can also serve as a coverup for weakness, doubt, and cowardice. It can be zealous, and sometimes over-zealous. It can be firm and steady as bedrock.

For all of St. Peter’s faults, Christ saw his good qualities and encouraged them. His grace helped St. Peter to become the Church’s first pope. It also helped him become a martyr in the end.

I pray that I may grow in the good qualities of that impetuosity and that I may be open to Christ’s grace. I pray to understand that Christ loves me and sees so much good in me, and that He will lead me to become the best person I can be if I will just follow Him and His will. I need to grow in faith and in hope–I am constantly in need of that!

Dear St. Peter, thank you for making yourself my patron for this year. Please pray for me!

A very merry and blessed Christmas to one and all!

What a marvelous, joyous, and wonderful season begins today on this feast of the Nativity of the Lord.  How fortunate we are if we know anything of the meaning and power of this holy day.

The name Christmas–assuming it is used at all and not displaced by the vague and generic “holidays”–has largely been stripped of that meaning and power.  What our society commonly refers to as “Christmas” has become a season which now begins even before Halloween and mostly involves spending money and decorating things.  Many people in our society will be giving one last Christmas hurrah tomorrow with bargain-hunting in the stores; many others will be eagerly taking down the decorations, having begun to grow tired of them after a couple of months.  At best, Christmas is a sentimental time, a holiday for children and family and feasting.

But today is the Nativity of the Lord.  Think on that name for a moment: the Nativity of the Lord!

Today is when God was born into human history, human nature, human experience.  He who created us and the entire universe from nothing, He who exists beyond all time and space in what we call Eternity, He who is revered by all the choirs of holy angels–it is His nativity on earth that we celebrate!  He did not come down in all His great glory, attended by legions of the Heavenly Host.  He did not appear as a mighty super-man.  If He had, we certainly would not refer to this day as His nativity.  No, He was born as creatures are born: as an infant.  Small, helpless, thoroughly dependent on others for survival.

Never had such a thing ever happened or even been dreamed of before.  Nor shall such a thing ever happen again in time and space.  It was a singular event, the Nativity of the Lord.  That alone should earn our respect and our amazement.  But like a drop of water impacting a still body of water, His Nativity changed everything–changes everything–and forever will change everything!  The mingling of the material and the divine, of history and eternity, of the finite and the infinite could not fail to change everything.  The birth of God in the world gave new birth to everything.  It elevated humanity and all creation to a previously unimagined dignity, while revealing in the almighty God a profound and previously unimagined humility.

Modern man may imagine that after more than two millennia, he is no longer affected by nor subject to that event.  He rationalizes away the holy season of Christmas as nothing more than a modern-day Saturnalia or Yuletide.  And so it has become!  While that is not entirely a bad thing, that isn’t the depth or breadth or truth of it.  While many modern men will be content to leave it at that and rush off toward the next big festival, the Christian can never be content with such a thing.

Instead, let us allow ourselves to dive deeply into the tremendous wonder of this holy season and be carried, transported, and transformed by it.  Let us appreciate and give thanks for the incredible thing our Lord did for us in His Nativity.  And let us not do so only today, but for the entire Christmas season: the Twelve Days of Christmas, the Epiphany, and up until the Baptism of the Lord–to my knowledge, this is what Catholics observe as the Christmas season.  While the rest of the world gets back to business as usual, let us persevere in the joy and wonder of Christ’s birth.

I’m blessed to share my home with two adorable furry housemates: Sabrina and Alvis.  In addition to companionship, comfort, and fun, they’ve also given me occasion to ponder my relationship with God, how I see Him, and how He perhaps sees me.  Granted, the analogy isn’t perfect; God sees me as His own daughter, not as a pet, and at the same time, He is far more superior to me than I am to my cats.  But it’s been helpful nevertheless.

No matter how unpleasant your situation is, no matter how little sense it makes to you, keep trusting!VetStreetCatTowelPic6

To my cats, getting locked up in a carrier, being taken to a strange place to be poked and prodded by strange people, then coming home only to be force-fed pills or vile liquids–sometimes with the added indignity of being wrapped up in a towel like a cat burrito–is nothing but a series of meaningless trauma.  They don’t understand that these things are happening in order to make, or keep, them healthy and feeling well.  And it is surely mystifying that the same person who was cuddling and feeding and playing with them just a short time ago should now turn so cruel and cold, ignoring their cries and their squirming.  So it is sometimes with me and God.  Sometimes life seems to take a cruel turn for no apparent reason, and sometimes God seems like a completely different Person, seemingly ignoring my pleas.

But just as I know that taking my cats to the vet and treating any ill condition is for their good, so does God know what good may come from times of testing, purification, building and re-building, fortifying my weak spots, strengthening me where I need it, and chiseling away ugly spots or sharp edges.  And if my will toward my cats is so good, then surely God’s will toward me is far better still!  And well, at least He hasn’t given me the burrito-wrap treatment… yet.

At the same time, be prepared to accept and to marvel that God is a complete mystery.

Each and every morning, my cats witness an astonishing ritual.  Each and every morning they see me close myself up in a small, cramped torture chamber that–horror of horrors!–sprays water all over me.  Water!  All over me!  And I submit myself to this insanity willingly, even with delight!  What sort of messed up masochist does that?!  And that’s just one example of the apparent insanity that possesses me.

Likewise, there are things I just can’t understand about God–things no mortal human can understand.  Like the Trinity.  Like the Passion and Crucifixion.  Like the Resurrection.  Like what exactly He sees in me that is so special that He created me out of nothing and holds me lovingly in existence, a little speck afloat in the unspeakable vastness of the universe–not only that but that He loves me!  These mysteries–both majestic and intensely intimate to my little life–always surround God, as He surrounds me with His marvelous deeds, His tremendous power, His unwavering attention, and His boundless love.  And how He must smile when we gaze toward Him wide-eyed and bewildered, just as I smile at my cat sitting nervously outside my shower!

How many people prefer to dismiss Him today as something impossible and foolish to believe in!  How many people are eager to dismiss all things that are mysterious and marvelous just because they cannot be examined by human eyes or neatly defined by human definitions!  What a magnificent relationship they are missing!

You’re always your best when you are simply yourself, flaws and all–there’s no need to fear rejection!

Silly SabrinaMy cats sometimes make me crack up with laughter (see: Sabrina being silly at left).  They do it without any shame whatsoever.  They are free spirits who do whatever comes naturally in the moment.  Sometimes, they make me shake my head because they don’t realize how incredibly comfy and easy their lives are–but I wouldn’t ever want it any other way!  Sometimes they’re a real handful–like when I’m trying to give them medicine and they just won’t be still, and I have to resort to the burrito-wrap.  But I understand and just do my best to make it as quick and painless as possible (knowing full well that they would beg to differ).  And sometimes they are so incredibly sensitive and insightful and tender toward me when I am sad or sick or in any kind of pain that it’s like God is acting through them.  They may never know what it means to me that they are just who and what they are, and that I love them for it.

I think God regards us the same way, whether we make Him laugh or shake His head or even when we squirm and kick and scratch and protest and do our darnedest to shove Him away.  He knows when we are trying to lie or hide or BS Him.  He sees straight through us.  He knows how we are made.  He knows our limitations.  He knows our individual personalities.  He knows them–He loves them–He even died for them.  And no matter how much we may reject Him–for He made us free to do so if we truly wish it–He never wills nor wishes to reject us.  That’s pretty amazing, isn’t it?  Sometimes, it’s a bit difficulty and even frightening to believe!  We are so fearful of the rejection we sometimes suffer from our fellow man.  We may instinctively try to throw up walls between ourselves and God.

But what liberty, what joy, what lightness of being and peace of mind can be ours if we will venture to just be ourselves before God!  I could never reject my cats just for being the cats they are.  And God would never reject me for just being the human being I am.  Nor would he reject any one of us for being who and what we are.

As good as we are to our pets, those little creatures we share our lives and homes with, God is far better–infinitely better!–to us.  And as much as we enjoy our pets, God rejoices so much more in us, His own children.  And as much as we would love to spend our whole lives with our beloved pets, so much more does God desire to spend all eternity with us.  So never doubt, never fear, never dismiss Him!  Curl up in his arms with all the confidence and security that your pets curl up next to you with!

Alvis chillin

Alvis says “Relax!”

Blithely browsing my Facebook feed, I came across astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson’s 8 books every intelligent person should read.  I’m always interested to read these kinds of lists.  I always presume knowledge and expertise, as well as good will, on the part of the book selector.  Boy did I bomb out on this one.

Here is the first item on the list:

1.) The Bible (eBook) – “to learn that it’s easier to be told by others what to think and believe than it is to think for yourself.”

Seriously? That’s the only reason to read the Bible?  Any book list that begins with such a potshot at the Bible is an automatic and complete FAIL.  It’s such an ignorant, dishonest, and arrogant statement that I can not possibly let it slide.

First of all, if the Bible’s adherents were so eager to be told what to think and believe, then why did they resist the Romans (and other powers before them) to the point of enduring torture, death, and all out genocide?  They could have easily saved their skins and their way of life by just offering incense to the State Gods to appease their oppressors.  They didn’t.  Why is that?

Secondly, the Bible didn’t just fall out of the sky saying “Here, this is how you have to think and act and believe. Do it or die.”  Rather, the Bible–not one book, but a diverse collection of books–came about over centuries and centuries, growing up from the thoughts, insights, religious beliefs, life experiences, and aspirations of a people. The Bible was a result, not a dictator.

It’s a full, rich body of literature, comprising everything from historical chronicles to songs, apocalyptic literature to erotic poetry. It’s full of profound wisdom, brutal honesty, a magnificent comprehension of human nature, and glorious artistry. And if the human writers, and we who have followed, have believed that their inspirations came from God, then fine–respect it and assume that they and we are sincere in that belief, even if you personally don’t believe it.

But whatever you do, if you care about being regarded as intelligent, don’t hold up a book you obviously don’t know or understand and misrepresent it to make yourself look superior.

Any true striving for knowledge requires humility and liberal-mindedness–they are required, not optional. Tyson betrays his lack of both, right from the beginning. And I bet there are lots of people who will gladly take his word for it.  Hopefully there are also people who will take his recommendation and find out for themselves the true value of reading the Bible, be they a detached scholar or a religious believer.


Tyson concludes by saying: “If you read all of the above works you will glean profound insight into most of what has driven the history of the western world.” 

Come now, sir, for that to be true, the list should have included at least one classic work from the Greeks, Romans, or Medievals.  Machiavelli and Sun Tsu are the best you can offer?  Western Civilization is neither impressed nor amused, Mr. Tyson.

This blog is brought to you by a Lay Dominican

St. Catherine of Siena, pray for us!
(Image from a painting at St. Catherine of Siena Parish, Metairie, Louisiana)

Catholic Blogs Page

Christian Blogs - Blog Catalog Blog Directory

My Amazon.com Wish List

Blog Stats

  • 266,674 visitors since 11 May 2008
November 2015
« Feb    



Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 154 other followers