Blithely browsing my Facebook feed, I came across astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson’s 8 books every intelligent person should read.  I’m always interested to read these kinds of lists.  I always presume knowledge and expertise, as well as good will, on the part of the book selector.  Boy did I bomb out on this one.

Here is the first item on the list:

1.) The Bible (eBook) – “to learn that it’s easier to be told by others what to think and believe than it is to think for yourself.”

Seriously? That’s the only reason to read the Bible?  Any book list that begins with such a potshot at the Bible is an automatic and complete FAIL.  It’s such an ignorant, dishonest, and arrogant statement that I can not possibly let it slide.

First of all, if the Bible’s adherents were so eager to be told what to think and believe, then why did they resist the Romans (and other powers before them) to the point of enduring torture, death, and all out genocide?  They could have easily saved their skins and their way of life by just offering incense to the State Gods to appease their oppressors.  They didn’t.  Why is that?

Secondly, the Bible didn’t just fall out of the sky saying “Here, this is how you have to think and act and believe. Do it or die.”  Rather, the Bible–not one book, but a diverse collection of books–came about over centuries and centuries, growing up from the thoughts, insights, religious beliefs, life experiences, and aspirations of a people. The Bible was a result, not a dictator.

It’s a full, rich body of literature, comprising everything from historical chronicles to songs, apocalyptic literature to erotic poetry. It’s full of profound wisdom, brutal honesty, a magnificent comprehension of human nature, and glorious artistry. And if the human writers, and we who have followed, have believed that their inspirations came from God, then fine–respect it and assume that they and we are sincere in that belief, even if you personally don’t believe it.

But whatever you do, if you care about being regarded as intelligent, don’t hold up a book you obviously don’t know or understand and misrepresent it to make yourself look superior.

Any true striving for knowledge requires humility and liberal-mindedness–they are required, not optional. Tyson betrays his lack of both, right from the beginning. And I bet there are lots of people who will gladly take his word for it.  Hopefully there are also people who will take his recommendation and find out for themselves the true value of reading the Bible, be they a detached scholar or a religious believer.

Finally:

Tyson concludes by saying: “If you read all of the above works you will glean profound insight into most of what has driven the history of the western world.” 

Come now, sir, for that to be true, the list should have included at least one classic work from the Greeks, Romans, or Medievals.  Machiavelli and Sun Tsu are the best you can offer?  Western Civilization is neither impressed nor amused, Mr. Tyson.